Design Solutions

Award winning design

Multimedia Services create professional clinical publications at commercial standards.

Ordering design? Things to prepare and consider

Multimedia
Image

How to supply content for design

All supplied content must be final.  If your content needs to be checked by any contributors or supervisors, this must be done before handing it over for design.

Text
Text is best supplied as a Microsoft Word document.  Keep your total word count to around 800 (maximum 1000 words).  If you have more than 3 image components (this includes graphs, tables, flowcharts or descriptive images), your word count needs to be closer to 500.
Graphs
Images
Logos

I'm ready to submit a job. What is the process?

Step 1

Supply your content (email or in person)

Step 2

Meeting (Optional if you would like to discuss any design preferences)

Step 3

Design begins (after payment approval if charging to a cost centre)

Step 4

Draft on-screen viewing followed by any adjustments

Step 5

A3 printed proof supplied for final client approval / sign off

Step 6

Printing / Collection

Tips for preparing your poster content

There are three main things to consider when preparing content for a conference poster: audience, message and space.

Think about where your poster will be displayed.  Who is the audience?  What is the message or vital information that you want to get across to that audience?  How much (if any) background information do you actually need to include in order for your message or research results to have context? Consider the type of poster that you want eg. creative or scientific (a creative poster requires a lot more design space and therefore a low word count).
Posters should present an overview, they should not contain your entire research. A “wall” of text is not enticing and is likely to be ignored.

Consider your poster heading carefully.  Your heading is the most important piece of information to attract your audience. 

The shorter the poster heading, the larger it can be displayed.  Long headings have to be reduced in font size in order to comfortably fit the rest of your content and then can’t always be read from across a room.

Think about what piece/s of information can be displayed in a visual way eg. a graph showing results of a survey or a flow chart showing an important process. Graphic components are used to display information that can be grasped at a glance in a clear and concise manner. They are used to attract attention from a distance and should display your most important information.  They do require a significant amount of poster space, so try not to include too many.

If you find you have too many words, bullets are useful to condense your information.  However, avoid putting your entire content into point form as this serves to take up even more space.

Keep your total word count to around 800 (maximum 1000 words) for a research poster.  If you have more than 3 image components (this includes graphs, tables, flowcharts or descriptive images), your word count needs to be closer to 500.

Break up your content into clear sections of information with sub headings.  This way an audience can easily navigate to a section of interest.  Scientific research posters are usually broken up into the following sections: Background, Aims, Methods, Results and Conclusions.